National Council for Reconciliation Act becomes law, a positive step toward fulfilling Calls to Action from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission

National Council for Reconciliation Act becomes law, a positive step toward fulfilling Calls to Action from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission


April 30, 2024 — Ottawa, Ontario, Unceded Algonquin Traditional Territory – Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada

Today, Bill C-29, which provides for the establishment of the National Council for Reconciliation (the Council), received Royal Assent and officially became Canadian law.

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission, which heard testimony and took direction from Survivors to draft the Calls to Action, envisioned an Indigenous-led, independent, and permanent Council to ensure long-term progress on reconciliation in Canada. Call to Action 53 called on the federal government to enact legislation to establish the Council. Bill C-29 is a direct response to this Call to Action and also lays the foundation to address Calls to Action 54, 55, and 56.

The Council, which will be representative of the diversity of Indigenous Peoples in Canada, and supported by nominations from the National Indigenous Organizations, will monitor, evaluate, and report on efforts to advance reconciliation and implement the Calls to Action. The Bill provides a framework for activities of the Council, including the development of a multi-year action plan to advance reconciliation, monitoring the policies, programs, and laws of the Government of Canada affecting Indigenous Peoples, and advocating for reconciliation in all sectors of Canadian society. The Council will produce an annual report on the progress being made toward reconciliation across all levels of government and sectors of Canadian society. This report must be tabled in both the House of Commons and the Senate, and the Prime Minister must provide a response as per Call to Action 56.  

Discussions throughout the parliamentary process — which included testimony from Survivors and Indigenous organizations — strengthened the legislation by considering the distinct perspectives of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis while also respecting the vision for the Council as expressed by Survivors through the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

The Government of Canada is fully committed to implementing the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, which together provide us with a roadmap to reconciliation.



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